Never Stop Learning

Learning

Ever have that dream where it’s the day of final exams and you realize you forgot you were taking the course and therefore never showed up to class, never did any of the reading, and are completely unprepared for the test?  Yeah, me too.

Like, ALL THE TIME.

While there are many theories as to why this particular nightmare is so common, my own self-diagnosis leads me to believe it is because I simply hate to be unprepared.  For me, the ultimate red-faced, anxiety-ridden, sweat-producing scenario is when someone asks me a question about an area in which I’m supposedly an ‘expert’ and my only response looks something like this…

Q9dSErL.png

(photo courtesy of imgur.com)

Ugh….AWKWARD!  Gives me the heebie-jeebies just thinking about it.  So what do I do when I find myself in one of these situations?   Continue reading

Mother Nature Gets A Facelift

DSC_0286.web

The last place anyone expects to find beauty is their garage floor, but that is exactly where I found the subject of today’s post.  In a previous post, Cameras Don’t Matter, I explained how the greatest tool in a photographer’s arsenal is the art of seeing – the ability to find the extraordinary in the ordinary.  Today’s post is a perfect example of that.

LEARNING TO SEE

Those of us who live where winter pays an annual visit are all too familiar with the salts and chemicals that are sprayed on the roads to melt the accumulating ice.  Although these precautions are necessary to keep our roads safe, the end result is ours cars, streets and garage floors take a beating as the snow melts leaving behind a crusty white residue.  Is all of this a nuisance?  Absolutely.  Is it ugly?  Well, that depends on how you see it… Continue reading

Cameras Don’t Matter

DSC_0276.wm

Hold on a second here… Wasn’t this blog supposed to be about photography?  If so, how can the title of this post possibly be ‘Cameras Don’t Matter’?  This is blasphemy!

Before you go calling the photography police, let me share a little story with you:  A photographer went to a socialite party in New York.  As he entered the front door, the host said “I really love your pictures – they are wonderful!  You must have a fantastic camera.”  The photographer said nothing until dinner was over, then he commented to the host: “That was a wonderful dinner – really delicious!  You must have a fantastic stove.” This simple story by photographer Sam Haskins sums up a key concept every photographer should know:  photography is not about the equipment. Continue reading